French Black Beans and Mushrooms with Gravy Vegan

There's something really satisfying about mushrooms treated in a french preparation. Wine, mustard and thyme are one of those classic combinations that evoke a fine dining experience without the fine dining price tag. 1 pint baby bella mushrooms chopped small 1 can black beans, rinsed 3 cloves garlic, minced 1 tbl tsps soy sauce 2 tbl spicy mustard 2 tsps  prepared, jarred, horseradish (horseradish, vinegar and salt) 1 tbl hot sauce 1/4 cup dry white wine 2 tbls olive oil 2 tsps dry thyme 1 tsp black pepper 2 tsps salt When you cook down mushrooms some kind of molecular magic happens that turns bland, spongy fungi into a delectable culinary powerhouse. Add some wine and a few other components and you've got a deep, dark saucy ragout that will make anything you cover it with irresistible.  It's a simple mixture that yields complex tastes and textures.  It won't take up a lot of your time to make, but you'll have a hard time not eating it all in one sitting.  Start yo

Crusade

I would like to complain for a moment and hopefully start a crusade. I doubt that will happen, but it would be nice if it did.

Personally, I am sick and tired of emailing all the cheese companies and asking them whether or not their enzymes are vegetarian. Not to mention, I'm not sure I trust their responses.

With the plethora of information available to today on food product why is it that there still isn't an indication of from where cheese enzymes are derived.

Ingredients lists mark in bold the possible, not even definitive, existence of milk, soy, wheat, egg and nuts on every package. And yet, when one reads a cheese ingredient label, it simply says enzymes. With no hint as to their murky origins.

The only company smart enough to mention their enzymes are animal free is Cabot. All the rest you have go to their website, search around, not find, email to ask, then wait an eternity for them to say this may contain or that might have.

It just isn't right. It should be clearly marked on each and every package of cheese what type of enzyme is used.

So far, I know, Crystal Farms is all veg. As are Great Lakesm, Heluva Good and Cabot. America's Choice (a and p) brand is mostly. Not American, or provolone and some others. Mostly Italian cheeses are not. Same goes for Sorrento and Sargento. Steer clear of Parmesan, Provolone, Asiago. Fontia. Muenster, Jarlsberg and American. Avoid Kraft altogether.

I wish I knew how to start a massive internet campaign demanding full disclosure for cheese enzyme sources. Vegetarians and vegans and people who do not wish to consume pork or veal need to band together. Non-vegetarian cheeses are made with calf (veal) and pork stomach enzymes. Plenty of non-veggies don't want to eat these foods and yet are unwittingly doing so. It's wrong.

To facebook I go.